Block tear

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Overview

your tears can't drain normally, leaving you with a watery, irritated eye. The condition is caused by a partial or complete obstruction in the tear drainage system. A blocked tear duct is common in newborns.


Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of a blocked tear duct include:

Excessive tearing.

Redness of the white part of the eye.

Recurrent eye infection or inflammation (pink eye)

Painful swelling near the inside corner of the eye.

Crusting of the eyelids.

Mucus or pus discharge from the lids and surface of the eye.

Blurred vision.

Causes

Chronic infection or inflammation of your eyes, tear drainage system or nose can cause your tear ducts to become blocked. Injury or trauma. An injury to your face can cause bone damage or scarring near the drainage system, disrupting the normal flow of tears through the ducts.

Risk factors

Certain factors increase your risk of developing a blocked tear duct:

Age. Older adults are at increased risk of developing blocked tear ducts due to age-related changes.

Chronic eye inflammation. ...

Previous surgery. ...

Glaucoma. ...

Previous cancer treatment.

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Complications

Recurrent eye infection or inflammation (pink eye) Painful swelling near the inside corner of the eye. Crusting of the eyelids. Mucus or pus discharge from the lids and surface of the eye.

Because your tears aren't draining the way they should, the tears that remain in the drainage system become stagnant. This promotes growth of bacteria, viruses and fungi, which can lead to recurrent eye infections and inflammation.


Any part of the tear drainage system, including the clear membrane over your eye surface (conjunctiva), can become infected or inflamed because of a blocked tear duct

Prevention

To reduce your risk of developing a blocked tear duct later in life, get prompt treatment of eye inflammation or infections. Follow these tips to avoid eye infections in the first place: Wash your hands thoroughly and often. Try not to rub your eyes.

The best way to avoid a blocked tear duct is to get care right away for eye problems, such as inflammation, infection or injury. To prevent eye inflammation or infections:


Avoid rubbing or excessively touching your eyes.

Avoid sharing eye products, such as eyedrops or cosmetics.

Clean contact lenses according to your eye doctor’s instructions.

Replace cosmetics, such as mascara, eyeliner or eyeshadow, every three to six months.