Cerebral aneurism

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Overview

A brain aneurysm is a berry-shaped bulge in an artery in or near the brain. Normally, arteries are strong and elastic, like hoses. An aneurysm develops when part of an artery wall becomes weak, stretches outward, and forms a bulge.


Aneurysms can develop in various parts in the body, for instance in the largest artery in the belly (abdominal aortic aneurysm) or an artery in the head (brain aneurysm). Brain aneurysms often form at points where the arteries that supply the brain with blood split and branch off.


Many people with a brain aneurysm will never know that they have one. But others experience symptoms – or their aneurysm is more likely to eventually rupture (burst) and cause life-threatening bleeding in the brain. To prevent such ruptures and relieve the symptoms, treatment is sometimes considered.

A brain aneurysm is a berry-shaped bulge in an artery in or near the brain. Normally, arteries are strong and elastic, like hoses. An aneurysm develops when part of an artery wall becomes weak, stretches outward, and forms a bulge


Symptoms

Symptoms of an unruptured brain aneurysm can include:

visual disturbances, such as loss of vision or double vision.

pain above or around your eye.

numbness or weakness on 1 side of your face.

difficulty speaking.

headaches.

loss of balance.

difficulty concentrating or problems with short-term memory.

Causes

It’s not clear why a brain aneurysm forms. Researchers believe these factors irritate and weaken blood vessels:


Smoking.

Blood infection.

High blood pressure (hypertension).

Amphetamine and cocaine use.

Traumatic brain injury (often caused by car crashes).

Atherosclerosis (fatty buildup on blood-vessel walls).

Risk factors

Risk factors include:

Smoking. Smoking is linked to both the development and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. ...

High blood pressure. ...

Size. ...

Location. ...

Growth. ...

Family history. ...

The greatest risk occurs in individuals with multiple aneurysms who have already suffered a previous rupture or sentinel bleed.

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Complications

The bulging aneurysm can put pressure on the nerves or brain tissue. It may also burst or rupture, spilling blood into the surrounding tissue (called a hemorrhage). A ruptured aneurysm can cause serious health problems such as hemorrhagic stroke, brain damage, coma, and even death.

Tears in one or more of the layers of the wall of the aorta (aortic dissection) or a ruptured aneurysm are the main complications. A rupture can cause life-threatening internal bleeding.

Prevention

maintaining a healthy weight – even losing just a few pounds will make a big difference to your blood pressure and overall health. exercising regularly – being active and taking regular exercise lowers blood pressure by keeping your heart and blood vessels in good condition.

To prevent an aortic aneurysm or keep an aortic aneurysm from worsening, do the following:

Don't smoke or use tobacco products. Quit smoking or chewing tobacco and avoid secondhand smoke. ...

Eat a healthy diet. ...

Keep your blood pressure and cholesterol under control. ...

Get regular exercise.