Gastropersresis

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Overview

The term gastroparesis literally means “stomach paralysis.” Gastroparesis could be defined as a condition of collective symptoms of nausea and vomiting associated with bloating and early satiety plus or minus upper abdominal pain, caused by delayed gastric emptying in the absence of mechanical obstruction. In the absence of mechanical obstruction, gastric stasis can occur due to abnormalities in the process of normal gastrointestinal motor function. It is a series of complex events that require coordination of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, neurons, and pacemaker cells within the stomach and intestine, along with the smooth muscle cells of the gut.

Gastroparesis is a condition that affects the normal spontaneous movement of the muscles (motility) in your stomach. Ordinarily, strong muscular contractions propel food through your digestive tract.

Symptoms

Vomiting.

Nausea.

Abdominal bloating.

Abdominal pain.

A feeling of fullness after eating just a few bites.

Vomiting undigested food eaten a few hours earlier.

Acid reflux.

Changes in blood sugar levels

Causes

injury to the vagus nerve due to surgery on your esophagus, stomach, or small intestine.

hypothyroidism.

certain autoimmune diseases, such as scleroderma link.

certain nervous system link disorders, such as Parkinson's disease link and multiple sclerosis link.

viral infections of your stomach.


Risk factors

injury to the vagus nerve due to surgery on your esophagus, stomach, or small intestine.

hypothyroidism.

certain autoimmune diseases, such as scleroderma link.

certain nervous system link disorders, such as Parkinson's disease link and multiple sclerosis link.

viral infections of your stomach.


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Complications

Over time, chronic inflammation in your esophagus can cause:


Inflammation of the tissue in the esophagus (esophagitis). Stomach acid can break down tissue in the esophagus, causing inflammation, bleeding, and sometimes an open sore (ulcer). Esophagitis can cause pain and make swallowing difficult.

Narrowing of the esophagus (esophageal stricture). Damage to the lower esophagus from stomach acid causes scar tissue to form. The scar tissue narrows the food pathway, leading to problems with swallowing.

Precancerous changes to the esophagus (Barrett esophagus). Damage from acid can cause changes in the tissue lining the lower esophagus. These changes are associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer.

Prevention

eat foods low in fat and fiber.

eat five or six small, nutritious meals a day instead of two or three large meals.

chew your food thoroughly.

eat soft, well-cooked foods.

avoid carbonated, or fizzy, beverages.

avoid alcohol.

drink plenty of water or liquids that contain glucose and electrolytes, such as.