Gullian barre Syndrome

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Overview

Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is the most common cause of acute, flaccid, neuromuscular paralysis in the United States. Guillain-Barre syndrome was first discovered more than a century ago. Advances in the past century include investigating the immune-mediated pathophysiology of the disease, recognizing the spectrum of presentations, advancing diagnostic modalities, prognostic models, and performing randomized trials of treatments to improve outcome. Given the morbidity that can occur without treatment, all physicians should have a knowledge of this rare disease.

Guillain-Barre (gee-YAH-buh-RAY) syndrome is a rare disorder in which your body's immune system attacks your nerves. Weakness and tingling in your hands and feet are usually the first symptoms. These sensations can quickly spread, eventually paralyzing your whole body.

Symptoms

A pins and needles sensation in your fingers, toes, ankles or wrists.

Weakness in your legs that spreads to your upper body.

Unsteady walking or inability to walk or climb stairs.

Difficulty with facial movements, including speaking, chewing or swallowing.

Causes

Most commonly, infection with campylobacter, a type of bacteria often found in undercooked poultry.

Influenza virus.

Cytomegalovirus.

Epstein-Barr virus.

Zika virus.

Hepatitis A, B, C and E.

HIV , the virus that causes AIDS.

Mycoplasma pneumonia.

Risk factors

Most commonly, infection with campylobacter, a type of bacteria often found in undercooked poultry.

Influenza virus.

Cytomegalovirus.

Epstein-Barr virus.

Zika virus.

Hepatitis A, B, C and E.

HIV , the virus that causes AIDS.

Mycoplasma pneumonia.

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Complications

Most people with Guillain-Barre syndrome recover completely or have only minor, residual weakness, numbness or tingling. Heart and blood pressure problems. Blood pressure fluctuations and irregular heart rhythms (cardiac arrhythmias) are common side effects of Guillain-Barre syndrome.

Neurology

Pulmonology/Intensive Care

Infectious Disease

 Immunology

Prevention

Doctors and scientists have not yet determined how to prevent Guillain-Barré syndrome. Since Guillain-Barré syndrome is not a disease itself, and it is not known exactly how it occurs, it is difficult to say how GBS could be prevented. Scientists are concentrating on finding new treatments and refining existing ones.